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3D Technology Tag
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ome days you need to move mountains & others you need to be a Swiss army pocket knife. I have always been an impatient person, but fortunately so are my clients. We’re a breed in an incredibly competitive field that need to move and adapt quickly, balancing design, marketing and construction on projects that may last years and have more twists than an Agatha Christie novel. If I had to pause a project every time something new came up then all my work would suffer, stalling everything else down the line, including hard release dates. Pushing through barriers, or knowing how to

When we start a condominium development project Randi and I sit around a table and discuss “what if we lived here”, which gives us an insight into the project outside of the brief. It’s how we see from the big picture down to the details, and ultimately identify who the buyers are and what it is they are looking for - buyers first, product next, which is like detective work in reverse. During one of these sessions Randi looked at a plan and said “oh my, look at these closets, they are awesome”, and then posed a question: Why haven't we

So you have your upmarket condo project, each residence painstakingly designed, and now it’s time to show thousands of potential buyers what’s on offer. You know it’s a great product, the numbers add up, the floor plans are terrific, so this should just be a slam dunk, right?… if only! There is a likelihood that you have sent out the plans to be turned into a 3D rendered presentation and they came back very “ho-hum”. The technical aspect, sizing, proportions and everything may be perfect, in fact they may have followed your brief perfectly, but there is nothing that reaches out

It is always satisfying to see a well done project come to a close, and in the case of Archiform 3D it is even more rewarding to see that the final product is almost indistinguishable to the design and renderings that we did. We had a client from the Casa Madrona Hotel & Spa, a top notch historic hotel in Sausalito, call to get some of my archives out from 2012. It gave us the opportunity to compare the design and renderings we worked on back then with what was actually built. The comparisons are interesting and satisfying. The top image is the original and the bottom is

UAVs have hit the scene big time, and considering we do so much aerial work we kept our eyes on them closely. The cost and limitations of a helicopter were often a sticking point, but the poor quality from a UAV drone made them impractical to use on a quality project – until now, of course. Archiform 3D is one of the first to purchase the new DJI Phantom 4, the biggest drone that one person can handle alone effectively and that also carries a camera that shoots acceptable quality. It’s for capturing photographs and video that get used with 3D composites,

Get an advance viewing and see the 128 year old Casa Madrona hotel-mansion in Sausalito’s high-tech renovation and presidential suite addition using the latest 3D stereoscopic tools. Casa Madrona Alexandra Suite living room Constructed in 1885 as a lavish residence for the William Barrett family of San Francisco, this grand mansion slipped slowly into decay until 1910 when John Gallagher, who had the vision to convert the mansion into a hotel, bought it. 67 years later the building was damaged and facing the threat of demolition when John Mays acquired the property and rebuilt it. Today, after changing hands, Casa Madrona is a

I am often asked my opinion on 3D workstations and render machines: Should people buy or build?What CPU should they get?What video card should they buy?How much RAM, etc? This time I decided to pool what I can tell people into one article that breaks down my philosophy on the subject and how I go about building a 3D workstation. First off you need to understand my background. I am a 3D artist, creating massive scenes and doing lots of animation – mainly for architectural and landscape work. My 3D needs can be extreme and even my smallest scenes eclipse the size of

The field of 3D in itself is a complex one – so much so that much of it now has fragmented into sub-fields. If you are to be an all-round 3D artist and animator then you need to be part artist, programmer, mathematician, physicist, computer technician, business person and circus juggler. But there is one complication that everyone involved in the 3D field has to deal with and it is the ire of most clientele – Render Processing. Every image and every second of video needs to be processed out and that often equates to delays and/or expense. Clients that are

Born from the need to render architectural images quicker a clever technique emerged. It was the use of 2D photographs on flat planes in 3D to create the illusion of a realistic object in a computer generated scene. Think of these as "cardboard cutouts" of people and objects. From a distance and from the right angle you may not be able to tell that they have no depth - the perfect illusion. The computer has less work to do, the image looks real and the client is happy. But, every shortcut has a downfall, and the negative of this technique is